THE WATCHMEN

WatchFund was founded by Dominic Khoo and partners. 2 of the newest members of our board of advisors include Korsak Chairasmisak and Michael Tay.

Watch Expert, By Appointment to H.R.H. Prince Hakeem Jefri Bolkiah of Brunei Darussalam

Dominic Khoo

65 8828 2928
invest@watchfund.com

At 35, Dominic Khoo retired as a professional photographer. During his 7 years of photography, he was nominated with his idol Annie Leibovitz for Asia Pacific Photographer of the Year and held the title of the producer of the most expensive photography coffee table book in the world. His fine art print of “Tony Leung in Beijing” made him Singapore’s most expensive living artist in 2012, and as a photographer was given Ambassadors’ roles to brands like Nikon and Leica Asia-Pacific. His works are currently in the permanent collection of the Singapore Art Museum.

Founder/Director, Foundation for the Arts & Social Enterprise Executive Director, Russia-Singapore Business Forum Founder, Sing Jazz

Michael Tay

65 9660 6028
invest@watchfund.com

From career diplomat to entrepreneur, Michael Tay displays the energy and creativity to stay relevant in changing times. In 2006, as the Singapore Ambassador to Russia, he initiated the Russia-Singapore Business Forum, which today involves businesses from more than 40 countries and is the only global business platform to which Russians and CIS businessmen congregate in significant numbers. Out of this arose the think-tank Centre for Emerging Markets, a joint initiative between the Skolkovo School of Management in Moscow and Singapore Management University.

Vice Chairman, CP All PCL First Vice Chairman/ Executive Director, Siam Makro PCL Co-Vice Chairman, Charoen Pokphand Group Honorable Member, Srinakharin Wirot University

Korsak Chairasmisak

65 9660 6028
invest@watchfund.com

Currently chairman of the executive committee for Thailand’s largest agribusiness conglomerate; CP Group, Mr. Korsak Chairasmisak is perhaps best known for building the company’s 7-Eleven business in Thailand, from just 27 branches in the 1990s to 8,400 today — the third-largest 7-Eleven network in the world after Japan and the United States